Italy is the home of some of the world’s most famous fashion houses, bringing us game-changing designers such as Giorgio Armani, Donatella Versace and Domenico Dolce. Amongst these influential visionaries, Brunello Cucinelli stands out for a number of reasons. He came from humble beginnings, began his business from scratch and quickly gained momentum thanks to his mastery of cashmere.

Here are a few more things you should know about the man, and the Brunello Cucinelli clothing empire he has built in a few short decades.

Fashion Meets Philosophy

There’s no questioning the unusual ethos that Cucinelli brings to the world of Italian fashion shopping. He has been keen to showcase his ethical, philosophical approach to both design and life in general whenever he makes appearances in the media.

That’s not to say that his brand isn’t inextricably linked with luxury; it’s very much a high end rival to many of Italy’s other top labels. But he’s far more committed to manufacturing clothing in a way that matches his ideology, and he has a desire to spread joy and love which you might not think would be the case for a billionaire.

Clearly his inclusive attitudes and positive outlook haven’t hampered the growth of his brand; instead they make fans of his work pay close attention to the designs he produces to try and see how these beliefs are expressed.

Much More Than Cashmere

There’s no question that cashmere plays a major role in defining Brunello Cucinelli as a fashion house, but that’s just a small part of the bigger picture.

From classic linen shirts that are perfect for formal and casual occasions alike, to jackets made from the softest alpaca which are ideal for lounging around at home, male and female buyers will find a lot to get their teeth into in this season’s range.

There are also plenty of on-trend additions which are riding high at the moment, including desert boots, boyfriend pants and padded vests that can take the chill out of the air while still making sure you look stylish.

Accessories and luggage are also represented in the line-up, with eminently Italian offerings like a weekender bag crafted from fine brown leather sitting alongside pocket squares, purses and even notebooks finished in silky-smooth suede.

You’re just as likely to find clothing made from denim as you are from the more traditional animal-derived materials when you cast your eye over the latest Brunello Cucinelli designs.

Respect Is Fashionable

Anyone who’s happy to foot the bill for the exquisite Italian fashions that this brand represents will be more than happy with the quality of the products that they get in return.

But another selling point comes from the efforts that the company’s founder has made to ensure that the people he employs are well compensated for their efforts, while also working in an environment that has their best interests in mind.

If the thought of wearing anything that was made in sweatshop conditions makes you uncomfortable, choosing Brunello Cucinelli clothing will give you peace of mind, while also helping you turn heads.

xoxo D.



Bold colours, super saturated blues and reds, and a reign of yellow we’re bound to witness and wear come 2018 fall. New York Fashion Week 2018 fall trends has begun (it’s almost ready actually) and it’s absolutely beautiful. According to designers we’ll be wearing a lot of clean lines, classic with a dash of retro (80s still strong, 70s are still in there), athlleisure inspired clothes are still trendy, long coats, faux fur, leather, beautiful colours and did I say yellow?! And the power suit.

What is new? Pop of colourful shoes, white boots very 80s style, tiny sunglasses, less prints, because everything is very clean, mature, sophisticated. At least so far it feels as if fashion took a massive step forward and decided to be more serious in a very fun and simple sort of way. We still have the amazing Alexander Wang with his insanely powerful black leather collection. STOP.

So I went through some of the shows up until yesterday and I’ve gathered some highlights and possible new trends we’ll be seeing next fall season. TBH we can start wearing them asap, a la winter or do them spring style.

1.80’s GLAM

When Tom Ford comes, alongside Alexander Wang and they shut down the show with the most powerful and glamorous outfits ever. Shiny leggings paired with glamorous blazers a la 90s Versace, hoop earrings (hallelujah) with a very retro hairstyle, animal prints mixed with animal prints, Matrix inspired vibes… everything that sparks empowerment and glamour is in! And so is everything 80s.

2. Shades of BLUE.

Blue, blue, blue moon…, anyway… 2018 fall is bringing back bold colours, and a bit of drama with blue being at the top of the list. From light blues, to cobalt hues, and navy blue outfits, either all-blue outfits, or mixed and matched with other shades – this colour will rule the world in 2018.

3. FAUX fur coats.

Fashion is slowly replacing fur with faux fur and it’s all over the runway. Not a new look, not a groundbreaking trend, but worth mentioning that it’s still strong, oversized, with a dash of classic.

4. Off the shoulders trend.

Think refined, think edwardian/victorian retro styles, romantic done in 2018. Very feminine, super long sleeves, and quite elegant.

5. Winter drama and glamour.

While denim is not so big, some designers prefer the skinny versions of the jeans pair with very deep and dramatic colours in coats, trench-like-sweaters that translate into a very casual but warm and elegant winter style. For evening everything is stunning: black, fur, spaghetti straps, fabulous tailoring that follows the body, gorgeous statement luxe earrings, red lips, sleek hair. It’s elegant and refined.

6. Oversized knit sweaters.

The sleeves are longer than a Monday, the cut is slouchy and oversized, and they come in all the trendy colours of 2018 (blue, red, purple and the classic greys et all).

7. Retro futuristic suits.

Desaturated shades and boxy shapes. Everything is relaxed, has good tailoring and a bit of 2018 sophisticated edge for those who love love love trends and fashion.

8. Sci-fi skiing.

Winter sports will be so trendy next winter you’ll wanna dress like a skiing doll high on winter steroids. Or maybe not.

9. Sports jackets & skirts & heels.

With athleisure still going strong, you can take your light sports jacket and pair it with your office skirt and heels. It’s a very eclectic, trendy and kinda sophisticated look.

10. DENIM.

Unfortunately for its lovers, denim is losing ground starting with this season. Not a lot is new next season: same ol’ oversized jackets, and pants, and I LOVE that light denim jumpsuit.

11. Dirty white.

Usually white is associated with summer but in winter it has that crispy luxe vibe that looks so good. New York fashion week fall 2018 trends come with all shades of white, from clean super crispy ones to more greyish tones.

12. White boots.

Hello the 80s called, they want their boots back. I love them, they’re so slouchy and point-toed it’s 80s meets 90s perfection!

13. ATHLEISURE

Say no more. Matrix looks, leggings, and sports jackets aka massive puffer coats.

14. Back to black.

Listen, black will never be out of style. Sure… there may be brief reigns of reds, and whites, and nudes, and god knows what, but alongside these – black will remain the #1 staple. Period.

15. Cut-outs & slits – DECONSTRUCTION

It’s probably the sexiest and most grownup-sophsiticted style ever. Pencil skirts are reinvented, peplum skirts look edgier, crop sweaters, one shoulder straps, cut-out bras, and see-through fabrics.

16. LEATHER.

Like black, leather will always always always be a staple, so much more than a trend that sticks to just one season. For New York fashion week 2018 fall trends – leather is incredibly dramatic, and black leather is more vinyl like, super sleek and superpower style paired with dramatic red fur, bold lips and sleek hair.

17. Fur insertions.

you’d think it’s all more subtle, and while it is… it’s also stronger, more feminine, and different, sort of like a past reminiscence of fur trimmed bell sleeves and fur scarves.

18. Graphic prints.

Prints overall are losing major ground in the next season as the sartorial world is focused more on solids, and vibrant colours sans the printed versions. Of course they’re not totally gone, and as little as they may be they still come up in graphic shapes, check prints, and animal prints.

19. Oversized long coats. 

Everyone give it up for the best New York Fashion Week 2018 trends. It’s practical, it looks amazing, it’s powerful and very dramatic. The coats are calf-length, loosely cut, in either faux fur, vibrant colours, long puffer coats, trench-coats inspired. Anything that is a style marriage of 80s and 2018 works.

20. PINK.

It’s 80s kitsch and super punk-cool done in a very glamours and very elegant way. All shades of pink will be massive next season.

21. Oversized suits.

Masculine relaxed lines are the key to 2018 fall. They’re paired with heeled boots, bold lips, matrix sunglasses, big belts (80s alert again), cropped puffer jackets. 

22. POP of colour. 

Never in a billion fashion years have colours looked more vibrant than they’ll be in 2018 fall. BEAUTIFUL. And bold. Orange, red, pink, blue, and yellow are all mixed together and colour blocked in the most fab fall outfits ever. I am absolutely obsessed with that bright orange long coat paired with that light pink dress and the pop of blue in the shoes. STOP. And I love love love that yellow sweater and grey skirt combo, again with the blue pop of colour in the shoes.

23. LOOSE CUTS. 

Nothing is sexier than a confident woman wearing loose closes that just hang effortlessly off her shoulders, like an 80s Melanie Griffith show stopper, in long loose pants and long coats, high heels and hands in pockets. Or a version of a posh 90s rockstar in loose pants that hang low paired with more fitted tops and heels.

24. POWERSUITS

I love the comeback and I love the new shapes. Pants are looser, blazers are longer and cinged at the waist, and the colours are more serious, dark, mysterious.

25. PURPLE rain. Purple rain. 

They say purple is the colour of kings and queens. It’s imperial. I love how it looks and if you can pull it off, and it goes well with your complexion do it. It’s incredibly sophisticated. For 2018 purple is worn either for evening or daytime, from light reddish tones to more deep burgundy-purple almost black styles.

26. RED. 

Here we are post Valentine’s Day and head to toe red still rules. 2018 is about the red’est-reds of them all.

27. Sweaters and pencil skirts.

I can almost see my mom back in the 80s wearing her baby blue sweater and navy pencil skirt with grey heeled boots. Perfection.

28. Trench-coats.

They’re more masculine, more loose cut, more dramatic somehow… like everything else in New York Fashion Week 2018 trends – trench coats are 50s menswear inspired. If you want statement go for check or animal prints. And always always always cinge them at the waist.

29. Yellow. 

A breath of summer in plain 2018 fall. Alongside red, blue, pink, and purple – yellow is one of the key players in New York Fashion Week 2018 trends.

30. NUDES. 

You may think they’re dainty and light, but they’re quite the opposite for 2018 fall. The looks are very strong and sleek and paired with dark lips and deep burgundy leather details.

xoxo D.

 

Both girls look absolutely ah-mazing as they celebrated the launch of Samsung’s new Galaxy S6 with Chrissy’s husband John Legend last night. Model Chrissy, 29, was wearing a pair of *very* saucy hot pants.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

As events continue to unfold following the devastating earthquake in Nepal over the weekend, there has been an outpouring of public support for both the country and the survivors in the wake of the tragedy.

Your eye color is suddenly translucent, cheeks are flushed, there is soft rosy halo around your lash line, and your lips…your lips deepen as blood rushes through them and creates a beautiful, tragic look. This lip happens to work well for day or evening and doesn’t require you to cry! This method allows you to wear any lip color in a very natural and believable way.

In my summer bag...

In my summer bag…

The secret to this look is creating a soft halo around your lip line. Start by taking your favorite lipstick, stain, or chubby lip pencil and saturating the color just on the center of your lips. Then, take your finger and blend the color over your lips as if you are rubbing.

Once the color starts dissolving into your lips, drag your finger right on top of your lip line, bleeding the color into your lip—especially over your cupid’s bow. It’s like finger painting on a sensual canvas, leading to the perfect stain that will last for hours.

This technique will also allow you to use those beautiful pops of color you’re always eyeing but never dare to buy, since the method will only capture the color’s essence. My favorite three colors to use for the tragic lip are a coral red, a classic mauve, and a deep wine. The first color I used in the pictures is YSL’s Rouge Pur Couture Vernis À Lèvres Glossy Stain in 8 Orange De Chine (which also made an appearance in this week’s lip stain roundup!)—the perfect orange-coral stain, but you must work quickly with blending as it sets quick. The second look is the rosy-mauve Clé de Peau Beauté Extra Rich Lipstick in 106. This creamy formula feels so heavenly on the lips and imparts the perfect “you-could-never-go-wrong” color, giving you a super-natural, yet flattering look. The third color is the Nars Velvet Matte Lip Pencil in Train Bleu. Swipe this vampy color dead-center on lips and give it a good rub down to transform your mouth into a deadly weapon that kills silently.

Shear Bracelet

Shear Bracelet

Finding the perfect gift for a friend can feel much more complicated than it should. You already know the person well enough to warrant giving her a present, but you also want whatever you give to reflect how well you know each other. Is it too impersonal? Is it fancy enough, or are you trying too hard? What do you give someone for a birthday versus a bridal shower? We’ve rounded up the obvious occasions for gifting: engagements, thank-yous, etc., but also considered what to give in less traditional situations — like when you’ve been a crappy friend and need to grovel for forgiveness (answer: weed). Or maybe you have a frenemy that requires an extra-special item, because you obviously have far superior taste. Whether you choose a really good bottle of bourbon, a sriracha keychain, or the perfect nursing bra, click ahead to be that person who always gives the right present to the right person.

 

For the past two springs, I’ve visited Antigua and am well aware of the mosquitoes that inhabit the Caribbean and the near impossibility of leaving without sunburn.

Tabloid in long-form, Anger details the scandals of Tinseltown’s very first stars (including Rudolph Valentino, Roscoe Arbuckle, and Clara Bow) against the backdrop of a city charged by rampant debauchery and high glamour.

Whereas Hollywood Babylon deals mostly with the era’s nightlife, the workday habits of early film stars were pretty wild too. For our purposes, it’s all about the prep. Hence a little history lesson today, particularly about how one might get ready for a period moving picture.

The stylist and curator’s handy checklist for next time you’re ready to make a Goodwill run.

The stylist and curator’s handy checklist for next time you’re ready to make a Goodwill run.

Early movies were shot on orthochromatic film, which was not sensitive to yellow-red wavelengths (so colors on that end of the spectrum became almost black). Blue and purple tones, in turn, showed up pale and whitish. The unfortunate on-screen effects of this were myriad—actors with ruddy skin looked dirty, and blue eyes would turn blank and spooky. The latter pitfall almost foiled the ambitions of eventual Academy Award winner Norma Shearer when she was told by D.W. Griffith, The Birth of a Nation director, that her eyes were “far too blue” to have any success in cinema.

In order to create an impactful (and hopefully, natural) look under such conditions in the 1910s and ’20s, most actors were tasked with applying their own makeup (A common press photo set-up was very Top Shelf-like and featured the starlet at her vanity.), and studios would distribute guides for proper use of color. Blue-toned greasepaint was applied as a foundation and contouring shade, while lips were painted yellow. In real life, actors must have looked truly bizarre when they arrived at the studio. Early greasepaint was texturally problematic. Since it was applied with a heavy hand, the surface layer would often crack when the actor’s expression changed (not great for a medium that relied so heavily on overly dramatic, silent expression). It could also be hazardous—as was in the case of Dolores Costello (Drew Barrymore’s paternal grandmother), whose complexion and career were both damaged beyond repair by early film makeup. In 1914, Max Factor, a wig and cosmetic shop owner in Los Angeles, developed a solution in the form of Flexible Greasepaint. After its invention, he became the most sought-after makeup artist in Hollywood and the leading figure in cosmetic development for the industry.

Factor’s personalized approach to makeup artistry cemented a few specific, studio-endorsed “looks.” For Clara Bow, he drew her sharply peaked cupid’s bow; Joan Crawford’s signature “smeared” lip (extending far beyond her natural line) assuaged the actress’ thin-lipped insecurities and was all thanks to Factor. Industry standards also required actors’ eyes to look deep-set and moody by shadowing them from lash line to socket, and eyebrows were drawn straight, bold, and very, very long (think Louise Brooks).

Street-Style-Trend-Fashion-Week-Fall-2014

When orthochromatic film gave way to panchromatic in the 1920s, shiny hair and eyelids captured the glow of incandescent bulbs used on-set to great effect. Factor kept pace, developing specific light-refracting hair dyes to suit this technical shift—even sprinkling gold dust on to Marlene Dietrich’s wigs when asked. He couldn’t rest on his laurels for long though—Technicolor was on the horizon, and with it came a new set of cosmetic challenges.

A final note: In the early ‘30s, still riding the panchromatic “high shine” wave, Factor created a slick lip coat for his famous clients. The formula would go on to become commercially sold as “X-Rated,” the world’s very first lip gloss. Something I think we’re all still kind of into.

—Lauren Maas

Going out for me is usually a very relaxed situation. I’ve probably been out to a bar or a club maybe once in the last two years. I know what my alter ego wants to do.

“Today I was asked when I realized I was in the wrong body. As much as it took me a really long time to come to terms with it, I think I have known since I can remember—since I could even think about gender or notice it. I was thinking about when I was in pre-K ,and I would dress up as Cinderella and do girl things. If I decided to wear a dress or roleplay as a princess, my teachers would tell me I couldn’t do it because I was a boy. So when you have everyone in your life telling you that you’re a boy, you kind of start to believe it, even though none of it comes naturally to you.

I never go out anywhere scene-y and known.

I never go out anywhere scene-y and known.

My transition has been a very gradual, very cerebral process. For a lot of people, it’s very easy to reduce gender to bodies, and that’s terrible. So to answer that question that I was asked today, I realized I was a woman after I was already living as a woman for about a year or so. Before that, I had this platinum blond hair, acrylics, and would dress in skirts, and wear purses—but I still identified as male. I was open-minded enough, growing up, to think that even if my outward appearance was female, I could still be male. If you read enough queer theory, you realize any sort of conjunction is possible. There are boys who want experience life as women but still be boys, and that’s valid.

I never understood why people would think that men couldn’t be as beautiful as women, so for a long time I didn’t have a word for myself. I was like, ‘I’m not a boy but I can’t let myself be a woman.’ So at the time I was like, ‘OK, I’ll be something else.’ It was weird for me, and in some ways, my thinking allowed me to keep putting off how I felt inside by just covering it up with this cerebral explanation.

[blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]There is a lot of psychological tension in trying to discuss anything with gender identity.[/blockquote]

I used to wear a lot more makeup. I fucking love Boy George, and I would put on that amount of makeup—like Boy George amounts of makeup. My eyeliner would like reach my hairline. I would go really crazy with it. I would try to overcompensate. Now I’m much more toned down, but I feel like all girls have that phase when experimenting with makeup for the first time. Though, if I started off putting on the amount of makeup I wear now, I knew I would just look like who I really am, and I think I was just not ready for that.

I was 14 years old when I got my first taste of makeup. I was in a band as the lead singer and we were playing one of our first shows. At that point all I could get away with was straightening my hair maybe once a month. So yeah, I was at my first show, and I remember finding a Revlon retractable black eyeliner in the bathroom.

ITG Nikki Reed

I put it on my waterline, not even thinking about the fact that I could get an eye infection as I picked it up off the floor—it was disgusting. I guess the cool thing about being in a band is that there is so much more freedom. There’s the classic ‘Dude (Looks Like A Lady)‘-feel. I felt like I could wear the eyeliner, and no one would care because I was at a rock show. Then I wore it again to a crowd that was more of a hardcore scene, and it wasn’t a cool experience. They were screaming at me to get off the stage and calling me the F word. I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’ I was 15 at that point. It was a terrible wake up call to me, all because I was wearing eyeliner—it’s not that big of a deal, and yet, people are already policing me for not performing this gender that I’m pretending to be. Obviously I was doing a shitty job at performing male. Sometimes I tell people that I really feel like I was in drag for over a decade, in the sense of performing male gender roles. I’d end the night and make sure to wipe off my eyeliner before I got home.

I had really bad acne in high school, so I’d get away with wearing coverall and that’s it. Still, my mother would look at me from her bed—I did, and still do, my makeup in her room because it has the best lighting—and be like, ‘What are you doing?’ I used to tell my mom like, ‘Don’t worry! I’ll never wear mascara!’ But it all happens…100 YouTube tutorials later you emerge in full face [Laughs].

I always admired makeup. I’d watch my grandma doing her makeup, and she’d always be put together. She would tell me that photos are forever, you can’t take it lightly, and you have to perfect it. Little things like that really stuck with me. Without my mother’s permission, I dyed my hair platinum blonde as a teenager. Having white hair changes your life, regardless of gender identity. It is a really crazy experience. You learn about so many different sides of people and how they perceive you—it’s crazy. It was motivation, I guess, and it was the first instance of feeling like I can’t hide myself.

I was really obsessed with Final Fantasy at the time, especially the Final Fantasy villains. If you really look at a Final Fantasy villain and analyze it, it’s a female head on a male body. I felt connected to the possibility of being really pretty, even if my body didn’t match up—there was a chance for the head portion to be on-point and consistent with how I view myself. After that, I started really diving into makeup as identity. Beauty can be a big deal for all girls, but beauty for a trans girl could be life-or-death. There’s moments when you could be placed in danger for not passing as a woman convincingly enough. One time I was walking with my friend and a guy was trying to holler at me, then he took out a knife. Makeup is much more serious to trans women. Even cis girls can relate—they get attacked and bullied in schools, growing up, because they’re not pretty enough.

I really feel bad for a lot of trans people and trans women who don’t have the experience [with makeup] before they come into themselves and have to learn to do their makeup in no time. They’re 35, they have kids, and they need to transition then—that’s the bravest thing ever. That’s not to say that I think people transitioning later in life necessarily need to wear makeup to be who they are. I just identified with it. The way I did it was just like how every girl picks up makeup skills—where your mom is like, ‘You can only put on lipgloss.’ You need time to practice, so it looks good. I used to just have these Zen three-hour makeup sessions. Of course, during the day I just wear tinted moisturizer, concealer, and maybe mascara. Sometimes I’ll do a wing, but just a little bit on the outer edge. But at night…at night is when I’d really take my time. I’d do my makeup from 7pm to 10pm and go out at midnight.

Oh la la! Paris Fashion Week is in full swing. We’ve been busy spotting all of our favourite looks at the shows, on the FROW and, also, on the streets. There’s been street style in abundance this year, and we’ve loved keeping our eyes peeled for all of our favourite looks in between the shows.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

If you’re looking for a stylish addition to your outfit, Folli Follie is your go to. Whether it’s shoulder bags, statement bracelets and fashionable scarves, the beloved brand caters for the classy trend-setter who loves to showcase their style through accessories.

Your eye color is suddenly translucent, cheeks are flushed, there is soft rosy halo around your lash line, and your lips…your lips deepen as blood rushes through them and creates a beautiful, tragic look. This lip happens to work well for day or evening and doesn’t require you to cry! This method allows you to wear any lip color in a very natural and believable way.

A fashion look from April 2012 featuring red jumper, faded jeans and sparkly pumps. Browse and shop related looks.

A fashion look from April 2012 featuring red jumper, faded jeans and sparkly pumps. Browse and shop related looks.

The secret to this look is creating a soft halo around your lip line. Start by taking your favorite lipstick, stain, or chubby lip pencil and saturating the color just on the center of your lips. Then, take your finger and blend the color over your lips as if you are rubbing.

Once the color starts dissolving into your lips, drag your finger right on top of your lip line, bleeding the color into your lip—especially over your cupid’s bow. It’s like finger painting on a sensual canvas, leading to the perfect stain that will last for hours.

This technique will also allow you to use those beautiful pops of color you’re always eyeing but never dare to buy, since the method will only capture the color’s essence. My favorite three colors to use for the tragic lip are a coral red, a classic mauve, and a deep wine. The first color I used in the pictures is YSL’s Rouge Pur Couture Vernis À Lèvres Glossy Stain in 8 Orange De Chine (which also made an appearance in this week’s lip stain roundup!)—the perfect orange-coral stain, but you must work quickly with blending as it sets quick. The second look is the rosy-mauve Clé de Peau Beauté Extra Rich Lipstick in 106. This creamy formula feels so heavenly on the lips and imparts the perfect “you-could-never-go-wrong” color, giving you a super-natural, yet flattering look. The third color is the Nars Velvet Matte Lip Pencil in Train Bleu. Swipe this vampy color dead-center on lips and give it a good rub down to transform your mouth into a deadly weapon that kills silently.

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Cute goats plus velvet jacket from Harajuku fashion on Storenvy. Kawaii fashion

Finding the perfect gift for a friend can feel much more complicated than it should. You already know the person well enough to warrant giving her a present, but you also want whatever you give to reflect how well you know each other. Is it too impersonal? Is it fancy enough, or are you trying too hard? What do you give someone for a birthday versus a bridal shower? We’ve rounded up the obvious occasions for gifting: engagements, thank-yous, etc., but also considered what to give in less traditional situations — like when you’ve been a crappy friend and need to grovel for forgiveness (answer: weed). Or maybe you have a frenemy that requires an extra-special item, because you obviously have far superior taste. Whether you choose a really good bottle of bourbon, a sriracha keychain, or the perfect nursing bra, click ahead to be that person who always gives the right present to the right person.

 

Blake Lively is currently on the promo tour for Age of Adeline, and when she isn’t being asked questions about her daughter James, she’s getting changed.

Tabloid in long-form, Anger details the scandals of Tinseltown’s very first stars (including Rudolph Valentino, Roscoe Arbuckle, and Clara Bow) against the backdrop of a city charged by rampant debauchery and high glamour.

Whereas Hollywood Babylon deals mostly with the era’s nightlife, the workday habits of early film stars were pretty wild too. For our purposes, it’s all about the prep. Hence a little history lesson today, particularly about how one might get ready for a period moving picture.

By the looks of things Blake is angling after a World Record for the number of outfits worn in one day.

By the looks of things Blake is angling after a World Record for the number of outfits worn in one day.

Early movies were shot on orthochromatic film, which was not sensitive to yellow-red wavelengths (so colors on that end of the spectrum became almost black). Blue and purple tones, in turn, showed up pale and whitish. The unfortunate on-screen effects of this were myriad—actors with ruddy skin looked dirty, and blue eyes would turn blank and spooky. The latter pitfall almost foiled the ambitions of eventual Academy Award winner Norma Shearer when she was told by D.W. Griffith, The Birth of a Nation director, that her eyes were “far too blue” to have any success in cinema.

In order to create an impactful (and hopefully, natural) look under such conditions in the 1910s and ’20s, most actors were tasked with applying their own makeup (A common press photo set-up was very Top Shelf-like and featured the starlet at her vanity.), and studios would distribute guides for proper use of color. Blue-toned greasepaint was applied as a foundation and contouring shade, while lips were painted yellow. In real life, actors must have looked truly bizarre when they arrived at the studio. Early greasepaint was texturally problematic. Since it was applied with a heavy hand, the surface layer would often crack when the actor’s expression changed (not great for a medium that relied so heavily on overly dramatic, silent expression). It could also be hazardous—as was in the case of Dolores Costello (Drew Barrymore’s paternal grandmother), whose complexion and career were both damaged beyond repair by early film makeup. In 1914, Max Factor, a wig and cosmetic shop owner in Los Angeles, developed a solution in the form of Flexible Greasepaint. After its invention, he became the most sought-after makeup artist in Hollywood and the leading figure in cosmetic development for the industry.

Factor’s personalized approach to makeup artistry cemented a few specific, studio-endorsed “looks.” For Clara Bow, he drew her sharply peaked cupid’s bow; Joan Crawford’s signature “smeared” lip (extending far beyond her natural line) assuaged the actress’ thin-lipped insecurities and was all thanks to Factor. Industry standards also required actors’ eyes to look deep-set and moody by shadowing them from lash line to socket, and eyebrows were drawn straight, bold, and very, very long (think Louise Brooks).

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When orthochromatic film gave way to panchromatic in the 1920s, shiny hair and eyelids captured the glow of incandescent bulbs used on-set to great effect. Factor kept pace, developing specific light-refracting hair dyes to suit this technical shift—even sprinkling gold dust on to Marlene Dietrich’s wigs when asked. He couldn’t rest on his laurels for long though—Technicolor was on the horizon, and with it came a new set of cosmetic challenges.

A final note: In the early ‘30s, still riding the panchromatic “high shine” wave, Factor created a slick lip coat for his famous clients. The formula would go on to become commercially sold as “X-Rated,” the world’s very first lip gloss. Something I think we’re all still kind of into.

—Lauren Maas

The model’s friends and family were all in attendance at the launch. Cara Delevingne, Hailey Baldwin, Bella Hadid, the girls of Haim and Kylie, Kourtney, Khloe and Kris Jenner were all there to celebrate Kendall’s success.

“Today I was asked when I realized I was in the wrong body. As much as it took me a really long time to come to terms with it, I think I have known since I can remember—since I could even think about gender or notice it. I was thinking about when I was in pre-K ,and I would dress up as Cinderella and do girl things. If I decided to wear a dress or roleplay as a princess, my teachers would tell me I couldn’t do it because I was a boy. So when you have everyone in your life telling you that you’re a boy, you kind of start to believe it, even though none of it comes naturally to you.

rs_634x1024-131124164140-634-kendall-jenner-ama-112413My transition has been a very gradual, very cerebral process. For a lot of people, it’s very easy to reduce gender to bodies, and that’s terrible. So to answer that question that I was asked today, I realized I was a woman after I was already living as a woman for about a year or so. Before that, I had this platinum blond hair, acrylics, and would dress in skirts, and wear purses—but I still identified as male. I was open-minded enough, growing up, to think that even if my outward appearance was female, I could still be male. If you read enough queer theory, you realize any sort of conjunction is possible. There are boys who want experience life as women but still be boys, and that’s valid.

I never understood why people would think that men couldn’t be as beautiful as women, so for a long time I didn’t have a word for myself. I was like, ‘I’m not a boy but I can’t let myself be a woman.’ So at the time I was like, ‘OK, I’ll be something else.’ It was weird for me, and in some ways, my thinking allowed me to keep putting off how I felt inside by just covering it up with this cerebral explanation.

[blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]There is a lot of psychological tension in trying to discuss anything with gender identity.[/blockquote]

I used to wear a lot more makeup. I fucking love Boy George, and I would put on that amount of makeup—like Boy George amounts of makeup. My eyeliner would like reach my hairline. I would go really crazy with it. I would try to overcompensate. Now I’m much more toned down, but I feel like all girls have that phase when experimenting with makeup for the first time. Though, if I started off putting on the amount of makeup I wear now, I knew I would just look like who I really am, and I think I was just not ready for that.

I was 14 years old when I got my first taste of makeup. I was in a band as the lead singer and we were playing one of our first shows. At that point all I could get away with was straightening my hair maybe once a month. So yeah, I was at my first show, and I remember finding a Revlon retractable black eyeliner in the bathroom.

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I put it on my waterline, not even thinking about the fact that I could get an eye infection as I picked it up off the floor—it was disgusting. I guess the cool thing about being in a band is that there is so much more freedom. There’s the classic ‘Dude (Looks Like A Lady)‘-feel. I felt like I could wear the eyeliner, and no one would care because I was at a rock show. Then I wore it again to a crowd that was more of a hardcore scene, and it wasn’t a cool experience. They were screaming at me to get off the stage and calling me the F word. I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’ I was 15 at that point. It was a terrible wake up call to me, all because I was wearing eyeliner—it’s not that big of a deal, and yet, people are already policing me for not performing this gender that I’m pretending to be. Obviously I was doing a shitty job at performing male. Sometimes I tell people that I really feel like I was in drag for over a decade, in the sense of performing male gender roles. I’d end the night and make sure to wipe off my eyeliner before I got home.

I had really bad acne in high school, so I’d get away with wearing coverall and that’s it. Still, my mother would look at me from her bed—I did, and still do, my makeup in her room because it has the best lighting—and be like, ‘What are you doing?’ I used to tell my mom like, ‘Don’t worry! I’ll never wear mascara!’ But it all happens…100 YouTube tutorials later you emerge in full face [Laughs].

I always admired makeup. I’d watch my grandma doing her makeup, and she’d always be put together. She would tell me that photos are forever, you can’t take it lightly, and you have to perfect it. Little things like that really stuck with me. Without my mother’s permission, I dyed my hair platinum blonde as a teenager. Having white hair changes your life, regardless of gender identity. It is a really crazy experience. You learn about so many different sides of people and how they perceive you—it’s crazy. It was motivation, I guess, and it was the first instance of feeling like I can’t hide myself.

I was really obsessed with Final Fantasy at the time, especially the Final Fantasy villains. If you really look at a Final Fantasy villain and analyze it, it’s a female head on a male body. I felt connected to the possibility of being really pretty, even if my body didn’t match up—there was a chance for the head portion to be on-point and consistent with how I view myself. After that, I started really diving into makeup as identity. Beauty can be a big deal for all girls, but beauty for a trans girl could be life-or-death. There’s moments when you could be placed in danger for not passing as a woman convincingly enough. One time I was walking with my friend and a guy was trying to holler at me, then he took out a knife. Makeup is much more serious to trans women. Even cis girls can relate—they get attacked and bullied in schools, growing up, because they’re not pretty enough.

I really feel bad for a lot of trans people and trans women who don’t have the experience [with makeup] before they come into themselves and have to learn to do their makeup in no time. They’re 35, they have kids, and they need to transition then—that’s the bravest thing ever. That’s not to say that I think people transitioning later in life necessarily need to wear makeup to be who they are. I just identified with it. The way I did it was just like how every girl picks up makeup skills—where your mom is like, ‘You can only put on lipgloss.’ You need time to practice, so it looks good. I used to just have these Zen three-hour makeup sessions. Of course, during the day I just wear tinted moisturizer, concealer, and maybe mascara. Sometimes I’ll do a wing, but just a little bit on the outer edge. But at night…at night is when I’d really take my time. I’d do my makeup from 7pm to 10pm and go out at midnight.